All shapes are of equal weight and they pass down onto the living creatures. A world is visible with eyes closed, with open eyes we wander through the darkness. Only for those who can make themselves invisible residing in the world of matter is comfortable, but that ability is not given to many. That is why it is important to understand that our pursuits must be aimed at the progression of life and not at the conservation of matter.

A person will travel and behold the world so that the knowledge of their own life is not hindered by a lack of knowledge of the lives of others. To that end there are vehicles. One can make oneself a vehicle or turn to those who trade in them. Some travellers move in groups, others travel alone. Yet others spend much time and money acquiring the vehicle. Their attention is turned to the vehicle itself and they pride themselves on the shape and size of it, even though they do not travel. This focus on the vehicle and not on the travelling leads to foolishness and is of no use to a person. The vehicle is of the visible world and the travelling is of the invisible world and together they bring harmony. The vehicle can never be more than matter and the wise must at all times be willing to let it go.

A person will make themselves a house where friends may gather, where meals may be shared with many, where what is vulnerable and perishable may take shelter, and where what desires to be in silence may find its silence. In the making of this there is great satisfaction, but the house is only a shape and the people will not attach themselves to it. The building of palaces is a good cause if the building is done to share the blessings with the many. That which has been built is of the visible world, the work is of the invisible world, and together they bring harmony. But even the greatest palace can be no more than matter and the wise must at all times be willing to let it go.

A person will dress themselves and the clothing shall keep out the cold when the cold oppresses life and it will shield agains the heat when the heat makes the body sigh. There is beauty in the search for shapes and in the weaving of fabrics, there is beauty in the colours the fabrics come in and great pleasure in the contact with the clothing and that which delights the gaze of another. In this clothing there is great satisfaction, but the clothing is only a shape and a person shall not grow attached to it. The clothing is of the visible world and the appreciation of it is of the invisible world and together they bring harmony. But clothes can never be more than matter and the wise must at all times be willing to let go.

And when it comes to the making of things that express desires one cannot name, then too no one shall grow attached to what there is. Music is admirable when it is made, when it is shared with friends, when it offers shelter to what cannot be said but what nevertheless wants to be in the world. There is great satisfaction in the making of music, and people may also be moved by the experience, especially when they express this through the movement of their bodies. The bringer of music is of the visible world and the music is of the invisible world and together they lead to harmony.

But one must not grow attached to the objects that give expression, one must only trouble oneself with the expression itself. One must not let oneself be beguiled by images, one must not let oneself be seduced by spectacle and grandiloquence when one can do nothing but behold, one must never behave as though standing still is moving forward and as though that which is entertaining must be so time and again.

Only the things that set people in motion and the things they can learn from should be pursued. That which can only be seen with the eyes but fails to set the senses in motion is to be avoided.

The making is good, for she is of the visible world. The desire for possession, although she herself is invisible, is still to be avoided, because she is always devoted to the visible world only.